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The Robert Shaw Chorale - Battle Hymn Of The Republic / Star Spangled Banner herunterladen

The Robert Shaw Chorale - Battle Hymn Of The Republic / Star Spangled Banner herunterladen Darsteller: The Robert Shaw Chorale
Titel: Battle Hymn Of The Republic / Star Spangled Banner
Etikett: RCA
# Cat: 47-8108
Freigegeben: 1962
Land: Germany
FLAC album: 2968 mb
MP3 album: 2751 mb
Bewertung: 4.6
Genre: Popmusik / Klassische Musik

Trackliste

1Battle Hymn Of The Republic5:20
2Star Spangled Banner3:57

Versionen

CategoryArtistTitle (Format)LabelCategoryCountryYear
47-8108The Robert Shaw Chorale And Orchestra Battle Hymn Of The Republic / Star Spangled Banner ‎(7", Single)RCA Victor47-8108US1962

Barcodes

  • Rights Society: GEMA / BIEM

Album

The Star-Spangled Banner - Robert Shaw. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей. The Star Spangled Banner Chorale. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. The Star-Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. The lyrics come from the Defence of Fort M'Henry, a poem written on September 14, 1814, by 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in Baltimore Harbor during the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812. Key was inspired by the large U. flag, with 15 stars and 15 stripes, known as the Star-Spangled Banner, flying triumphantly above. Текст песни: O say, can you see, by the dawns early light What so proudly we haild at the twilights last gleaming Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight Oer the ramparts we watchd, were so gallantly streaming. Listen to online Robert Shaw Chorale, The - Battle Hymn Of The Republic, Star Spangled Banner, or download mp3 tracks: download here mp3 release album free and without registration. On this page you can not listen to mp3 music free or download album or mp3 track to your PC, phone or tablet. Buy Robert Shaw Chorale, The - Battle Hymn Of The Republic, Star Spangled Banner from authorized sellers. The album included the following session artists: Conductor. Robert Shaw. Joseph Habig. Part of my Reflections series. Turn the volume up for this song and if it doesn't give you goose bumps you need better speakers This starts out a Robert Shaw Chorale was a professional chorus founded in New York City in 1948 by Robert Shaw, a Californian who had been drafted out of college a decade earlier by Fred Waring to conduThe Robert Shaw Chorale was a professional chorus founded in New York City in 1948 by Robert Shaw, a Californian who had been drafted out of college a decade earlier by Fred Waring to condu read more. The Robert Shaw Chorale was a professional chorus founded in New York City in 1948 by Robert Shaw, a Californian who had been drafted out of college a decade earlier by Fred Waring to conduct his Glee Club in radio broadcasts. The Chor read more. Lyrics to 'The Star Spangled Banner' by Robert Shaw Chorale. O say can you see, by the dawn's early light,, What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming. Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, In full glory reflected now shines in the stream, 'Tis the star-spangled banner - O long may it wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave And where is that band who so vauntingly swore, That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion A home and a Country should leave us no more Their blood has wash'd out their foul footstep's pollution. Robert Shaw Chorale. Download MP3. MP3 320Kbps. Artist songs. What Shall We Do with the Drunken Sailor. The Battle Hymn of the Republic, also known as Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory outside of the United States, is a lyric by the abolitionist writer Julia Ward Howe using the music from the song John Brown's Body. Howe's more famous lyrics were written in November 1861 and first published in The Atlantic Monthly in February 1862. The song links the judgment of the wicked at the end of the age through allusions to biblical passages such as Isaiah 63 and Revelation 19 with the American Civil War